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Protected variable in Python

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  • Last Updated : 10 Jan, 2020
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Prerequisites: Underscore ( _ ) in Python

A Variable is an identifier that we assign to a memory location which is used to hold values in a computer program. Variables are named locations of storage in the program. Based on access specification, variables can be public, protected and private in a class.

Protected variables are those data members of a class that can be accessed within the class and the classes derived from that class. In Python, there is no existence of “Public” instance variables. However, we use underscore ‘_’ symbol to determine the access control of a data member in a class. Any member prefixed with an underscore should be treated as a non-public part of the API or any Python code, whether it is a function, a method or a data member.

Example 1:




# program to illustrate protected
# data members in a class 
  
  
# Defining a class
class Geek: 
      
    # protected data members 
    _name = "R2J"
    _roll = 1706256
      
    # public member function 
    def displayNameAndRoll(self): 
  
        # accessing protected data members 
        print("Name: ", self._name) 
        print("Roll: ", self._roll) 
  
  
# creating objects of the class         
obj = Geek() 
  
# calling public member 
# functions of the class 
obj.displayNameAndRoll() 


Output:

Name:  R2J
Roll:  1706256

Example 2: During Inheritance




# program to illustrate protected
# data members in a class 
  
  
# super class 
class Shape: 
      
    # constructor 
    def __init__(self, length, breadth): 
        self._length = length
        self._breadth = breadth 
          
    # public member function 
    def displaySides(self): 
  
        # accessing protected data members 
        print("Length: ", self._length) 
        print("Breadth: ", self._breadth) 
  
  
# derived class 
class Rectangle(Shape): 
  
    # constructor 
    def __init__(self, length, breadth): 
  
        # Calling the constructor of
        # Super class
        Shape.__init__(self, length, breadth) 
          
    # public member function 
    def calculateArea(self): 
                      
        # accessing protected data members of super class 
        print("Area: ", self._length * self._breadth) 
                      
  
# creating objects of the 
# derived class         
obj = Rectangle(80, 50
  
# calling derived member 
# functions of the class
obj.displaySides()
  
# calling public member
# functions of the class 
obj.calculateArea() 


Output:

Length:  80
Breadth:  50
Area:  4000

In the above example, the protected variables _length and _breadth of the super class Shape are accessed within the class by a member function displaySides() and can be accessed from class Rectangle which is derived from the Shape class. The member function calculateArea() of class Rectangle accesses the protected data members _length and _breadth of the super class Shape to calculate the area of the rectangle.


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