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Name the place where river Narmada originates

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  • Last Updated : 29 Aug, 2022
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An important waterway between the Arabian Sea and the Ganges (Ganga) River basin has traditionally been the Narmada River, also known as Narbada or Nerbudda, which is located in central India. Ptolemy, a Greek geographer who lived in the second century CE, dubbed the river Narmada. The Narmada River rises in the Maikala Range in eastern Madhya Pradesh near the boundary with Chhattisgarh state at a height of roughly 3,500 feet (1,080 meters). It is a west flowing river along with Tapi. These rivers did not form valleys instead they flow by the faults created due to the formation of the Himalayas. Before turning northwest to pass the city of Jabalpur, it takes a circuitous route through the hills close to Mandla. At Marble Rocks Gorge, it then bends southwest and enters the structural valley between the Vindhya and Satpura ranges. The river continues through Madhya Pradesh before turning westward and entering Gujarat state. It is a peninsular river system.

Just before Bharuch, the Narmada meets the Gulf of Khambhat through a delta that is 21 kilometers (13 miles) wide. Along its 800-mile (1,300-km) course, which drains the northern slopes of the Satpura Range, it passes through the Hoshangabad plains, the Dhar upland, and the Mahishmati lowlands, and the gorges at Mandhata and Murata. The Dhuandhar Falls, located southwest of Jabalpur, is just one of the many waterfalls along the river. On occasion, floods in the valley between the hills are brought on by its tributaries. Hindus hold that the Narmada River originated from the god Shiva’s body, and they consider it to be second only to the Ganges in terms of purity. From Bharuch to Amarkantak, up one bank of the river and down the other, is the route of the pradakshina pilgrimage. Other significant towns and cities on its banks, in addition to Jabalpur, include Hoshangabad, Maheshwar, Handia, and Mandhata.

Gulf of Khambhat, also known as the Gulf of Cambay, is a trumpet-shaped indentation in the Arabian Sea that runs between Mumbai (Bombay) and the Kathiawar Peninsula in Gujarat state, western India. Between Diu and Daman, it is 120 miles (190 km) wide at its mouth, but it quickly narrows to 15 miles (24 km). Numerous rivers, including the Sabarmati, Mahi, Narmada (Narbada), and Tapti, enter the Coastal area. The reason for its great tidal range (40 feet [12 meters]) and the high velocity of the incoming tides is due to its shape and position concerning the southwest monsoon winds. Shoals and sandbanks make passage dangerous, and all of the ports in the Gulf have been impacted by silting brought on by tides and river floods.

Bharuch, one of the oldest ports in India, and Surat, known for its early trade relations with Europe, are located on the eastern side of the gulf. At the top of the gulf is the settlement of Khambhat. The discovery and development of oil, notably close to Bharuch, at the head of the gulf, and in the offshore Mumbai High field, has led to a commercial rebirth in the area even though the importance of the Gulf ports has only been local.

The Amarkantak mountain range in Madhya Pradesh where the Narmada, the Peninsula’s longest west-flowing river, rises. It is the largest river in Gujarat and the fifth largest river in the entire nation. After passing through Gujarat, Maharashtra, and Madhya Pradesh, it reaches the Gulf of Cambay. The river’s length up to the dam site is 1163 kilometers, but its entire length from source to sea is 1312 kilometers (815 miles) (723 miles). The river channel at the dam site is 488 meters wide (1600 feet) during high floods, while it is 45.70 meters wide during the summer (150 feet). The largest flood ever recorded was 70,847 cumecs (2.5 million cusecs) on September 7, 1994, whereas the lowest flow ever recorded during the summer was 8.5 cumecs. The dam is designed to resist a flood of 87,000 cumecs (3.07 million cusecs).

Sardar Sarovar Dam

The river has a 97,410 square kilometer total basin area, of which 85,858 square kilometer is in Madhya Pradesh, 1658 square kilometer is in Maharashtra, and 9894 square kilometer is in Gujarat. There is an 88,000 km2 drainage area up to the dam site. In the basin, there is an average annual rainfall of 112 millimeters.

The river has a 97,410 square kilometer total basin area, of which 85,858 square kilometer is in Madhya Pradesh, 1658 square kilometer is in Maharashtra, and 9894 square kilometer is in Gujarat. There is an 88,000 km2 drainage area up to the dam site. In the basin, there is an average annual rainfall of 112 millimeters. At a reliability of 75%, the yearly run of the dam site is 27.22 MAF.

Benefits of the Dam

A total of 3112 villages in 73 talukas in 15 districts of Gujarat will receive irrigation facilities as part of the Sardar Sarovar Project, which would encompass 18.45 lac ha. of land. Additionally, it would use the lift to irrigate 2,46,000 ha of land in the crucial Rajasthani desert districts of Barmer and Jalore and 37,500 ha in the tribal hills region. While the whole command in Rajasthan is drought-prone, about 75% of the command area in Gujarat is. With a guaranteed water source, this region will soon be drought-proof. such as other benefits drinking water supply, power, flood protection, wildlife, and so forth.

Frequently Asked Questions

Question 1:  What is the Narmada river famous for?

Answer:

It is the largest flowing river in Madhya Pradesh and is known as the ” Lifeline of Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat”.

Question 2: Is Narmada a rainfed river?

Answer:

 Around 60 percent of the Narmada river is said to be rainfed. Narmada was raised from a spring.

Question 3: Why Narmada river does not make the delta?

Answer:

The slope of the western ghats is steep due to which these rivers have a rapid flow and don’t have to travel much distance to drain into the sea.

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