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Growing up Male in Madhya Pradesh in 1960s

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  • Last Updated : 07 Jul, 2022
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Becoming a boy or a girl has a significant role in one’s identity. What other kind of behavior is acceptable for girls and boys, and what boys and girls may and cannot do, is taught to us by the society in which we grow up. We are conditioned to believe that these things are the same everywhere. We’ll also look at how the various roles that boys and girls are allocated prepare them for their future roles as men and women. We shall discover that men and women are valued differently in most communities. Women’s roles and work are typically undervalued in comparison to men’s roles and efforts.

Growing up Male in Madhya Pradesh in the 1960’s

While equal effort is done by men and women, it is not recognized equally. Boys and girls had different perspectives in Madhya Pradesh, India. While the girls’ school was closed, the boys’ school was open.

Boys and girls attended different schools starting in class six. Girls played in complete isolation and protection from the outside world in the school’s central courtyard. The boys’ school missed a courtyard, and their playground was only a sizable area that was connected to the building. The boys observed as hundreds of schoolgirls filled the overcrowded streets every evening after classes ended. These females appeared to be walking with purpose as they walked the streets. This was in opposition to the boys who would play, stand around idle, and do bicycle stunts on the streets. The girls merely used the roadway as a route to go home. Because they were also afraid of being mocked or abused, the females always walked in groupings.

After reading the two previous cases, it becomes clear that there are several ways to grow up. We frequently assume that there is just one way for kids to develop. We are most familiar with our own experiences because of this. We will learn that our family’s elders’ childhoods were likely significantly different from ours if we speak with them.

We certainly understand that communities make it quite clear who is a boy and who is a girl. Starting at a very young age, this occurs. For example, we are provided with a variety of toys to play with. Boys were usually given cars to play with and girls with dolls. Playing with either toy may be a lot of fun. Why then are boys given cars and girls’ dolls? Children are told through toys that their lives as men and women would be quite different.

If we stop to think about it, even the simplest and most common things may make a difference. What boys should play in games, how girls should dress, and whether guys should be rough or soft-spoken. All of them are strategies for communicating to kids that they will perform particular roles as men and women when they grow up. This has an impact on the courses we may study or the occupations we can select later in life.

Sample Questions

Question 1: Write simply about Madhya Pradesh boys’ and girls’ equality?

Answer:

While equal effort is done by men and women, it is not recognized equally. Boys and girls had different perspectives in Madhya Pradesh, India. While the girls’ school was closed, the boys’ school was open.

Question 2: How was the situation of Boys and Girls seeming to look at each other as mentioned above?

Answer:

Boys and girls attended different schools starting in class six. Girls played in complete isolation and protection from the outside world in the school’s central courtyard. The boys’ school missed a courtyard, and their playground was only a sizable area that was connected to the building. The boys observed as hundreds of schoolgirls filled the overcrowded streets every evening after classes ended. These females appeared to be walking with purpose as they walked the streets. This was in opposition to the boys who would play, stand around idle, and do bicycle stunts on the streets. The girls merely used the roadway as a route to go home. Because they were also afraid of being mocked or abused, the females always walked in groupings.

Question 3: Is that true that children are grown up with differences? Explain.

Answer:

 Yes, we are provided with a variety of toys to play with. Boys were usually given cars to play with and girls with dolls. Playing with either toy may be a lot of fun.  Children are told through toys that their lives as men and women would be quite different.

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